3 Reasons to conduct a fire hydrant flow test

Fire departments utilize a few ways to put out fires. One is through pump trucks that carry up to 750 gallons of water at a time. Another is through foam trucks that feed oxygen-killing foam into a fire to extinguish flames.

The Tried and True Fire Hydrant

However, the most used tool is the tried-and-true fire hydrant. Invented in the 19th century, not much has changed. Water is pumped from lines underneath the hydrant into a hose. Then, it’s delivered through a high-pressure nozzle for targeted fire-fighting.

Constant Hydrant Testing

This doesn’t work if a fire hydrant flow test isn’t conducted on a regular basis. Performed with a team comprised of water utility and fire department representatives, these tests determine if a hydrant is fully operational or requires service.

In order to understand a bit more, here are three reasons to conduct a fire hydrant flow test.

Determine the Proper Pressure

Flow isn’t determined by opening the hydrant full throttle and checking how much water comes out. Measurement equipment from companies like Hurco Technologies is hooked to the hydrant. As the water is slowly released the instrument measures the pounds per square inch (psi) of the flow. The results determine if it’s nominal or requires adjustment.

Review of Corrosion and Potential Debris

If the pressure is below normal, the team checks for corrosion or collected debris in the line. Both can cause blockage and result in the decreased water flow. In some cases, a hydrant flush may be required at the same time to clear this out.

Conclude if a Repair is Required

If hydrant flow is well below average, the test team may call in others to determine the issue. Perhaps the water line needs to be repaired or replaced. On the oth

Fire departments utilize a few ways to put out fires. One is through pump trucks that carry up to 750 gallons of water at a time. Another is through foam trucks that feed oxygen-killing foam into a fire to extinguish flames.

The Tried and True Fire Hydrant

However, the most used tool is the tried-and-true fire hydrant. Invented in the 19th century, not much has changed. Water is pumped from lines underneath the hydrant into a hose. Then, it’s delivered through a high-pressure nozzle for targeted fire-fighting.

Constant Hydrant Testing

This doesn’t work if a fire hydrant flow test isn’t conducted on a regular basis. Performed with a team comprised of water utility and fire department representatives, these tests determine if a hydrant is fully operational or requires service.

In order to understand a bit more, here are three reasons to conduct a fire hydrant flow test.

Determine the Proper Pressure

Flow isn’t determined by opening the hydrant full throttle and checking how much water comes out. Measurement equipment from companies like Hurco Technologies is hooked to the hydrant. As the water is slowly released the instrument measures the pounds per square inch (psi) of the flow. The results determine if it’s nominal or requires adjustment.

Review of Corrosion and Potential Debris

If the pressure is below normal, the team checks for corrosion or collected debris in the line. Both can cause blockage and result in the decreased water flow. In some cases, a hydrant flush may be required at the same time to clear this out.

Conclude if a Repair is Required

If hydrant flow is well below average, the test team may call in others to determine the issue. Perhaps the water line needs to be repaired or replaced. On the other hand, if the hydrant is old enough, it may be the culprit. In either case, a quick repair is required to return the hydrant to action.

For more information on these tests, speak to your local government or fire department representative.

er hand, if the hydrant is old enough, it may be the culprit. In either case, a quick repair is required to return the hydrant to action.

For more information on these tests, speak to your local government or fire department representative.